Wednesday, January 11, 2006

Better than white truffles in a wooden box
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Tonight, D, J, and I put together a tasting menu after scouring the day's harvest for fresh ingredients. What resulted was not only a great meal, but a culinary revolution.

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A menu that withstood the course of the night. Handwritten by yours truly. Also, notice the rustic tablecloth, burns I made with a blowtorch, and the earl grey tea stains.

The bread (unpictured): Bouchon French Bread, with extra virgin olive oil from Matzorkis Family Olive Orchards of Falasarna in Crete and balsamic vinegar, aged 500 years

Yeah, even the bread was that special

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Green Globe artichokes steamed in water from le Alps

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Pan seared wild sea "coquilles", with ragout of heirloom tomatoes, Aunt Louise's Latvian lentils with saffron basil "emulsion"

Yeah, just as complicated as it sounds. The sea scallops were perfectly cooked, with a carmelized exterior and a buttery, melt in your mouth interior. The lentils tasted just like how Aunt Louise used to make, which, I assure you, is no easy task indeed. Note the rustic plate to match the authenticity.

The palate cleanser:
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Freshly grated orange "rinds" (on Asian plate)

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Ambrosia, imported from Mt. Olympus, Greece
Harney & Sons Earl Grey with fresh Woodbury Farms grapefruit and hand grated orange "rinds"

This is truly the nectar of the gods. Clean and even bordering on healthy, who can ask for a better dessert? Oh, just you wait.

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Valrhona Chocolate "Bouchon", with citron orange rind "reduction"

Rich and dark, the "bouchon," or French for cork, just oozed with "goope" when cut into. The heavenly citron, simmered for 4 hours, made for a very interesting and brilliant pairing.

The wine of the night was selected by our chief sommelier, Sir Robert Borden. A 2002 Thomas Fogarty, it was full bodied and low in acidity. An excellent choice, Mr. Borden.

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8 Comments:

Anonymous j-anne said...

It was truly a beautiful dinner. Next time I make the trek up to Sunsetville, however, I'm getting a room at a nearby motel. The last thing I wanted to do tonight with a full stomach was to make the painful 10-minute drive back to the city!

1/11/2006 2:53 AM  
Blogger Robyn said...

Wow, that's intense. I don't think I have any friends who'd do that. :P

1/11/2006 1:56 PM  
Anonymous H.H. said...

You must be in high favor with the gods, for they have never let a mere mortal experience what is the greatest food of all - heavenly ambrosia. Woe to Hecuba, for she died without having tasted such divine goodness.

Yours,
The Hungry Hippo (H.H.)

1/11/2006 6:14 PM  
Blogger Sam said...

it's funny. your handwriting looks exactly like mine. Well it's hard to see, but in the darkness that's my claim and I am staking it.

1/11/2006 6:38 PM  
Anonymous weezy said...

you guys are something else... and j-anne's sister is a hottie

1/11/2006 8:41 PM  
Blogger Helen (AugustusGloop) said...

Yum! And I love the aged and weathered menu too!

ps. We went to Ithaca to check out Cornell! A beautiful campus and the plantations are so X-Files-ish! =)

1/12/2006 3:12 AM  
Blogger Arthur said...

Haha, I love the "use" of quotation marks. Classic.

You guys can cook waaay better than I can.

1/13/2006 3:35 AM  
Blogger Jennifer said...

Helen - haha, I agree. Potential crime scenes are just sprinkled throughout campus.

Arthur - glad you caught onto our spoof on Mr. Keller's menu writing "artistry". I guess his innovation lies not only in the realm of food, but also that of menu grammar.

1/14/2006 12:21 AM  

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